Tuesday, July 29, 2014

JESTER PLACED ON WEBSITE HEADER



  Jester Placed On Website Header
                                                             
                                                              

  DRYDEN--Neversink resident and 2013 MVP Tri-Valley Central School shortstop Rodney "Taylor" Jester has received the honor of having his picture placed on his college's website header, facebook and twitter accounts.
  Following a successful freshman year at Tompkins-Cortland Community College (TC3) where he batted .333 with an On Base Percentage (OBP) of .349 and a Slugging Average (SLG) of .405 Jester will report for the fall league season on August 27.
  TC3 Sports Information Coordinator Peter Voorhees noted that the college's website header "is the most visible image we have in athletics and it is the header on our website and the cover photo on our facebook and twitter accounts."
  Voorhees said, "we generally keep the same image up for about a year."
  "When it comes to the individual photos, we try to select students that we feel best represent our College and their respective teams," and "we start out looking for the best  returning player on each team." Voorhees added.
  The Sports Information Coordinator pointed out that, "all three of the images on this year's banner," men's baseball player (Rodney T. Jester, Tri-Valley H.S./Grahamsville, soccer player Hannah Wildenstein, Dryden H.S./Freeville and men's basketball player Joshua Spence, Bayard Rustin H.S./Brooklyn) "have great eyes and body angles that make the college logo or name visible and are good representatives of what we want our student-athletes to be.....a winning trifecta."
  Jester last week completed summer collegiate travel baseball with the Northeast Pride Collegiate team.
 
 

 









Monday, July 28, 2014

SOUTHERN GREENS


Youth & The Beauty In Our County

                                      
  In traveling throughout Sullivan County and after interviewing and taking pictures of four community Renaissance projects one gets a great feeling about  Sullivan Renaissance and the beautification efforts brought forth by so many volunteers and Renaissance interns.
  Of course all of  this would never be possible without this beautification and community development program principally funded by the Gerry Foundation and sponsors like Bold Gold Media Group/Thunder 102, Fisher/Mears Associates, Kristt Company, Robert Green Dealerships, Sullivan County Democrat, The River Reporter, Thompson Sanitation and WSUL/WVOS.
  There is pride in our communities and volunteers are hard at work on their projects that makes a big difference to both year-around residents and visitors/tourists to our county.
  Sullivan Renaissance sponsors sixteen interns who work in their communities taking care of gardens and other public projects including small planter boxes to established gardens to park enhancements and Main Street revitalization and these young people work alongside community volunteers to make a big difference in their communities.
  The Sullivan Renaissance Youth Development and Leadership Program is a partnership between Sullivan Renaissance and the Center for Workforce Development that provides paid work experience for Sullivan County youth between the ages of 16 and 20.
  This outstanding Youth Development program deserves a lot of credit and a big pat on the back as the interns participate in weekly meetings where they discuss current issues, meet with local leaders, develop their own leadership skills and explore career options.
  We tip our hat in admiration and thanks for what Sullivan Renaissance does and in providing a goal where youth can develop a sense of place and find their voice on issues that are important to them.

A Family Golfing Tradition

                                             
  Family traditions run deep and strong in the game of golf and such is the case with Sullivan County's McNamara's golf course maintenance family.
  Last week we highlighted information about Patrick McNamara, the new golf course superintendent at the Town of Fallsburg Tarry Brae and Lochmor Golf Course.
  Leadership as a golf course superintendent has been a major part of this family and it all started as a post Army mechanic's job for Ray McNamara in 1957 at the former Homawack Lodge on Route 209 near Ellenville.
  As local golf history reveals Ray's three sons, Mike, Pat and Terry all began their golf course maintenance careers at the Homawck.
  When each of the boys turned 14 they went to work on the course doing work that did not involve using power tools but started out by raking bunkers, weeding and helping wherever they were needed.
  In addition to working on the course dad Ray thought the boys needed an appreciation of the game so he taught them to play.
  Mike, the oldest, is presently the superintendent at Grossinger's Country Club where he started as a seasonal employee at the age of 18, after already working for his dad for four years.
  Mike graduated from Delhi in 1977 and became an assistant at Grossinger's and after seven years became the superintendent in 1984.
  As we mentioned last week Patrick, before taking the superintendent's job at Tarry Brae and Lochmor was superintendent at Kutcher's. He, of course,  also worked with his father and also worked courses at Mohonk, Paupack  Hills, Swan Lake and Apple Greens.
  Terry, the youngest son, spend 10 years in the hotel technology business in Atlanta, Ga. and returned to Sullivan County and went to work for his brother, Mike at Grossinger's and also worked at the Mohonk House and held the superintendent's position at the former Pine's Hotel golf course.
  Dad Ray still works at the Big G (Grossinger's) as does Terry.
  Over the years this well-known golf course maintenance family always collaborated with each other on problems and projects and they always were able to lend equipment and expertise.
  Everyone at these golf resorts benefited from this family that shared their experience.
  The four McNamara's always possessed a strong interest in keeping up with the changes and challenges in golf course construction and maintenance and had many opportunities to add their imprints to the courses they worked at.
  This family of golf course maintenance experts have always been very supportive of professional organizations like the New York State Turfgrass Association and the Golf Course Superintendents Association.
  And yes, the family still gets together to play a friendly but competitive round of  golf ..... where there are no gimme putts.

  Ed's Outlook

   Several upcoming golf tournaments to report on this week.
   The Steve Lagoda Scholarship Golf Tournament will be  held August 25 at the Villa Roma golf course. This event will have a 1 p.m. shotgun start. A putting contest is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. Four person captain and  crew format.
  Contact Brian Starr, PO Box 115, Lake Huntington, NY 12752 or call 845-397-2939.
  The Roscoe Kiwanis Club's 23ed annual tournament is set for July 27 at the Tennanah Lake Golf & Tennis Club.  For information call 607-498-5000.
  The Lockmor LTGA Ladies League is holding a special "Goofy Golf" Disney Classics Ladies Invitational on Wednesday, July 23 starting with a 7:30 a.m. Continental breakfast and registration.
  Tee time is 8:30 with a 18-hole shotgun start featuring a format of 2 player best ball of foursome with handicaps. There will be prizes, raffles, free give aways and a special prize for the best costume.
  A portion of the proceeds will benefit The Allyson Whitney Foundation. For information call the Lochmor Golf Course at 845-434-1257.

  Ed Townsend is a PR Consultant to the sport of Golf. Ed writes and compiles the information for this column. If you have league and tournament information, shoot a hole-in-one or even shoot your age, let Ed know at 845-439-8177 or 845-866-0333, email at edwardctownsend@hotmail.com, fax at 845-205-4474. View this column and all of Ed's pictures at http://bght.blogspot.com We are also on Facebook and Twitter.

  The Golf Tip
  By Robert Menges

  In today's ever-changing golf game, most players are under the influence that if they hit the ball longer they will play better.
  Even though technology has increased how far the ball will travel, the scores are about the same.
  There is no doubt that is you hit the ball longer you should have less club to the green and be able to get the ball closer to the hole and make more putts.
  I believe this to be true, but you better be able to hit the shots on the green close to the pin. In order to hit the ball close, I feel it is important to carry three wedges in your golf bag. Most golfers have a pitching wedge that comes with the set. This club has about a 47-49 degrees of loft.
  You have a choice to make for the other two wedges. A gap wedge comes with about 50 to 53 degrees of loft and a lob wedge is about 60 to 64 degrees of loft. I would choose between these two clubs depending on how far you hit the ball.
  A lob wedge will save you shots around the green and a gap wedge will help you  with the in between yardages in the fairway. You should always carry a sand wedge that has 54-57 degrees of loft.
  Some touring Professionals will carry four wedges in their bag. The next time you play a round of golf, count how many strokes you take from 100 yards in to the hole. I think you find this will total about 60 percent of your score. When you are trying to improve your score, it is important to lower the number of shots you take close to the green. I think having three wedges in your bag will help you accomplish a lower score.
  Robert Menges is the golf professional at the Swan Lake Golf & Country Club, Mt. Hope Road, Swan Lake. He is available for private lessons and if you have a question or subject you would like covered, he can be reached at 845-292-0323 or by email at menges@hughes.net

  Putting Tip
  By Joseph Bermel Jr.

  A special key to good consistent putting is finishing the putting stroke.
  Most golfers do not finish and then they wonder why they are short of the hole.
  You start the stroke.......you must finish and hold the finish.
  Finishing means the putter head is a minimum 2 feet past the ball and this helps the momentum and the ball will roll end over end and will reach the hole.
  Joe Bermel is available for private lessons, goup, corporate, organizations and golf show/tournaments. His special edition DVD "How To Putt Well" and his Putting Calendar are available at 631-589-1384, at his Web site www.ThePuttingDoctor.com or by email at joe@theputtingdoctor.com

The Future of Major Championships


  Pinehurst No. 2 was nothing but perfect for the U.S. Open.....at least in the traditional sense of major championships in the United States.
  Many are wondering if we may have seen the future of golf courses with many golfers indicating that Pinehurst No. 2 had some thinking British Open.
  In watching the U.S. Open you immediately got the feeling that it looked like a yard that had not been watered in a month.
  Sandy areas replaced thick rough off the fairways and looked like this was partially covered with weeds but Pinehurst Resort officials called it "natural vegetation."
  The new look course showed edges of the bunkers ragged, the turf was uneven just off some of the greens and instead of those usually nice major championship fairways golfers were greeted with a blend of yellow, green and brown.
  This was the plan all along but initial reaction from some local golfers I talked to was negative.
  Been told that the new design required a big percent less water but USGA executive director Mike Davis plainly stated, "brown is the new green," and that a course doesn't have to be sparkling green to be enjoyable.
  Shortly after this Donald Ross gem was awarded its third U.S. Open in 15 years, the fabled No. 2 course went through a gutsy project to restore it to its natural look from yesteryear......before the notion that the condition of a course had to be perfect.
  In talking with several local golf course superintendents their general feelings were that in our area they were more concerned with getting rid of water than putting it down and that drainage systems are very important for maintenance here.
  An interesting fact about the new look U.S. Open course is that the new design requires 74 percent less water and a substantial savings on fertilizer and pesticides and golf course maintenance folks have been cognizant of costs as budgets get squeezed at golf courses.
  As for the idea of a major U.S. tournament being played without a rough golfers at the U.S. Open pointed to clumps of grass in the sandy areas along with the wireglass bushes and of course some weeds.
  Reality is that there was rough very evident on this course and it's probably what rough used to be like before irrigation.
  What the new look Pinehurst No. 2 U.S. Open course restoration project involved was the removal of some 35 acres of sod and keeping only 450 of the 1,150 sprinkler heads.
  Are golfers giving this new look their approval as they look back in the past......we don't expect many local superintendents to give us this new look until golfers think it's OK or budgets force them to do so.

Ed's Outlook

  Rory McIlroy took to Twitter recently to ask about his missing golf clubs.
  It seems they were lost in transit as he traveled from the U.S. Open in Pinehurst N.C., where he tied for 23rd., to
Dublin, Ireland for the start of the Irish Open June 19-22.
  "Hey@United," he tweeted. "Landed in Dublin yesterday morning from Newark and still no golf clubs.....sort of need them this week.....can someone help?"
  To United's credit, the airline got back to him via Twitter and then followed through on getting his clubs to the course.
  Ah, the power of social media.
  It might have been just as well had United not found the clubs. McIIroy only played the first two days of the tournament. He got the weekend off having missed  the cut.

  Ed Townsend is a PR consultant to the sport of golf. Ed writes and compiles the information for this column. If you have league and tournament information, shoot a hole-in-one or even shoot your age, let Ed know at 845-439-8177, cell at 845-866-0333, email at edwardctownsend@hotmail.com or fax at 845-205-4474. View this column and all of Ed's photos at http://bght.blogspot.com We are also on Facebook and Twitter.

The Golf Tip
By Robert Menges

  Yes it does rain on the golf course.
  As much as we would like to avoid rain some moisture is going to fall on us while we are enjoying a tour of the golf course.
  Additional advise for playing in the rain is important because the rain is full of distractions. It can become a distinct advantgage for players with powers of concentration stronger than their physical abilities.
  With the assumption that you at least have your rain suit handy, here are a few extra arrows for your wet quiver.
  * Have you tried Latex gloves? Rubber on rubber doesn't slip. Pulling them out at just the right time can be fun too. I like the yellow-colored ones the best. Naturally, it takes a plop, but you can do it. The "rain gloves" made by several manufactures are another option if you lack some chutzpah.
  * Wear your contact lenses, if you have them. It's tough to hit the ball when you'r seeing three of them because of the raindrops on your glasses.
  * Bring several towels. They'll come in handy for a variety of reasons.
  * Bring several hats..... golfers can't hack the drips.
  * Re-read the casual water rule.
  * Always dry your ball and your putter blade before making the stroke.
  * Remember shots out of the wet sand always go farther.
  * Bring a baggie for your scorecard. It's nice to show your opponent how badly you "out mudded" then once you return to the 19th hole.
  Robert Menges is the golf pro at the Swan Lake Golf & Country Club, Mt. Hope Road, Swan Lake. He is available for private lessons and if you have a question you would like covered. He can be reached at 845-292-0323 or via email at menges@hughes.net

Putting Tip
By Joseph Bermel Jr.

  In putting I link organization with strategy.
  The strategy component is easier than you might think, involving:
  A. Picking a distance based on the current realistic skill from which a golfer can reasonably attempt a one-putt, say 10 to 12 feet.
  B. With all putts longer than say, 12 feet, the thought is to get the first putt close enough to the hole to get a 2-putt result.
  Remember, 2 putting is good putting for the average golfer.
  Joe Bermel is available for private lessons, group, corporate, organization and golf shows/tournaments. His special edition DVD "How To Putt Well" and 2014 Golf Tip Calendar is available by calling 631-589-1394, at his Web site www.ThePuttingDoctor.com or by email at joe@theputtingdoctor.com

Nulligans & Par 3 Challenge



                                                               
                                                                         

                                                                
                                                          
                                                          
                                                             
                                                                
                                                                 
                                            


  Have you ever played the game of golf using tennis balls or putting on a green with the hole surrounded by a toilet bowl seat?
  If not you missed the most unique fun-filled par 3 Fun Tournament ever staged in Sullivan County and it all took place July 19 at the Roscoe Twin Village Golf Club (TVGC) which transformed it's nine-hole course into an 18-hole par 3 extravaganza.
  Tournament manager Ralph Kirchner (you remember Ralph on the radio years ago telling the listening audience that his car dealership in Roscoe was "worth the trip from anywhere," redesigned the nine hole TVGC course that proved to be not an easy par 54 round of golf.
  Eleven foursomes (44 golfers) competed in this two-member team best ball tournament that was held to benefit the TVGC that featured mixed and men's teams including six-year-old Drew Gerber, the youngest player all the way from Tampa, Florida (Ralph's grandson).
  The tournament committee also sold nulligans to golfers and this permitted golfers to take away a good shot from their opponents in their foursome......just the opposite of a mulligan which allows a golfer to shoot a replacement ball eliminating a bad shot.
  Here are a few of the not routine golf shots golfers faced:
  * Had to replace your golf ball with a tennis ball on hole # 4 and if you think this was easy go out and try hitting a tennis ball with a golf club.....saw a lot of high scores on this hole.
  * On hole # 6 after reaching the green you had to putt with a putter provided at the green which had a hole in the middle of the putter and you placed your ball in the hole and had to putt without striking the ball with the front of the putter...go ahead and try this one.
  * On hole # 8 right handed golfers had to tee off left handed using a left handed five wood and left handed golfers had tee off using a right handed five wood....some interesting shots resulted here.
  * On hole # 15 you had to tee off from a sand trap.
  * On hole # 16 you had to tee off a cone
  * Golfers on hole # 17 had to tee off sitting on a stool.
  * On hole # 18 each team had to use only one club.
  And  lets not forget the toilet bowl golf hole which featured the hole being surrounded by a toilet bowl seat......go ahead and figure this one out.
  A fun chipping contest featuring trying to get your ball into a plastic pool some 30-yards away and a bumpy putting contest took place at the Courtyard Restaurant deck area where there was also light refreshments and drinks and at the end of the tournament a buffet with pasta, pizza, salad and drinks.
  Surviving this tournament as champions were in the men's category, Ed Guthrie and Jim Sackett, mixed couple winners were Mary and Tom Knickerbocker, Ron Shulte won the putting contest and Ed Guthrie and Mary Knickerbocker won the closest to the pin contests.
  Next year's event is in the planning stages.

Ed's Outlook

   We compliment R & A's decision to extend Tom Watson's exemption by a year so he could compete at St. Andrew's and......perhaps.....end his career in this championship at the home of golf.
  Watson thought the 2010 Open and walk across the famous Swilcan Bridge  was his last. He was 60 and had another four years through this year due to his runner-up finish the year prior at Turnberry.
  Watson thought his walk across the bridge would be his last and it was a less-than-satisfying sendoff since he ended up missing the cut on a day that saw a lengthy delay due to strong winds which meant his round didn't finish until nearly 10 p.m. but still light out before sparse crowds.
  He recalled being "sad" at that time, knowing it was his last walk across the bridge, but that all changed for the 65-year-old who will get to play one last Open at St. Andrews in 2015.
  "I appreciate the R & A more than you know," said Watson, a 5-time winner of the Claret Jug. "It's very special to be able to finish out my career," and "that's the place I want to
 finish my career in the Open Championship, 40 years from the first time I played."
  A fond farewell gesture.....nice things happen to nice people.

  Ed Townsend is a PR consultant to the sport of golf. Ed writes and compiles the information for this column. If you have league and tournament information, shoot a hole-in-one or even shoot your age, let Ed know at 845-439-8177 or 845-866-0333, email at edwardctownsend@hotmail.com or fax at 845-205-4474. View this column and all of Ed's photos at http://bght.blogspot.com We are also on Facebook and Twitter.

The Golf Tip
By Robert Menges

  The flying right elbow is one of the game's best known negative touchstones.
  It occurs in the back swing when the elbow juts out behind the player so the right arm forms the letter V or L, depending on the angle from which you view it.
  What's wrong with a flying right elbow? It restricts the width or arc of the back swing. It also makes it difficult to get the shaft parallel at the top of the swing with the longer clubs, a restriction that reduces power. Finally, you don't want the elbow jutting out in the downswing because this also limits power and adds inaccuracy to the mix.
  So, you must drop it down and in toward your right side. This conection is an extra move that must be made in less than a second of real time. However, trying to keep the elbow in close to the body is too restrictive. It prevents a free-flowing overall swing motion and narrows the width of the back swing, both of which costs power.
  The right elbow can move away from the right side in the back swing so long as it remains pointed down toward the ground and in a viable, effective position. This will generate fluidity in the swing and allow the elbow to easily and readily return to or near the right side in the downswing. You do want the elbow close to the body in the downswing because it keeps the club moving from the inside.
  To put it another, more meaningful way, it prevents the club from going "over the top" and cutting across the ball from the outside to inside the target line at impact. Which is to say, with the right elbow in close to our side at impact, you are less likely to hit a slice. Indeded there is a very good chance you will get a nice little draw on the ball.
  Robert Menges is the golf professional at the Swan Lake Golf & Country Club, Mt. Hope Road, Swan Lake. He is available for private lessons and if you have a question or subject you would like covered, he can be reached at 845-292-0323 or by email at menges@hughes.net

The Putting Tip
By Joseph Bermel Jr.

  "Keys to good consistent putting"
  1. Organization of our mind.
  2. Use the successful Putting Doctor System, GAP (Grip, Alignment, Ball Position, PPR (Pre Putt Routine) 100% of the time.
  3. Always stay focused.
  4. Use Correct Strategy for every putt.
      A. Realistic 1 putt attempt or
      B. Putt closest to the hole for 2 putt result.
  5. Visualize shape of the putt when reading and at address.
  6. Feel the speed with your eyes, mind and hands.
  7. Look 5X (five times) at the distance between the ball and the hole before putting.
  8. Always remain confident in your ability.
  9. Finish every putting stroke.
  10. Practice putting sessions-30 minute sessions 5-6 times every week.
  11. Remain patient always....your 1 putt opportunities will happen.
  Joe Bermel is available for private lessons, group, corporate, organization and golf shows/tournaments. His special edition DVD "How To Putt Well" and his 2014 Putting Tip calendar are available by calling 631-589-1384 at his web site www.ThePuttingDoctor.com or by email at joe@theputtingdotor.com

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Pride Competes Against Former Pro


  The Northeast Pride Collegiate travel team in their inaugural year competing in the Hudson Valley Collegiate Baseball League recently competed against a former professional major league baseball  scouts knowledge as they weighted their chances in  making the league playoffs.
  Maintaining tradition and keeping an older professional active in the amateur collegiate sport of baseball is certainly a big part of the Wappinger Yankees team success as was evident after witnessing 76-year-old Eric Gluck working with pitchers on his team giving them both offensive and defensive strategy.
                                                               

  Eric serves this team as vice-president of player personnel and also works with the pitchers and catchers providing them with his 50-years of baseball knowledge including 20 years of major league experience as a scout for the Chicago White Sox and the Baltimore Orioles. He also provides help with defensive mechanics.
  During his professional scouting years he scouted many well-known players including Roy Smith, Al Leiter, Shawon Dunston and Manny Ramirez.
  Gluck  noted that as a youngster he grew up in game of  baseball as "my dad was a tremendous athlete and he taught me the basics from day one."
  Eric pointed out that he played the outfield in high school baseball and is a graduate from Yonkers High School and went on to graduate from Ithaca College but did not play college baseball.
  He indicated his baseball skills did not meet college standards and that "I was more concerned about academics where I obtained my degree in Health Science and Human Performance and received my Master credits at City College in New York and started my scouting career at the age of 20."
  Gluck pointed out that he never would have become a professional baseball scout if it hadn't been for " Ralph DiLullo who was one of the most famous baseball scouts this sport has ever seen and when DiLullo spoke baseball managers listened to him."
  "He spent a lot of time with me and taught me what I needed to know and  it was he who opened the door for me with the White Sox," Eric said.
  DiLullo had a book written about him and made TV appearances on the David Letterman show.
  Eric said he was mentored by DiLullo who was a professional baseball player, manager and scout whose career in the sport spanned some 60 years and received the high honor of being elected to the Professional Baseball Scout's Wall of Fame.
  Gluck is also associated with a baseball instruction academy, has been inducted into the Dutchess County Baseball Hall of Fame and is about to be inducted into the Dutchess County Sports Hall of Fame.
  In the recent game against the Yankees played at the SCCC General's Field two pitchers both bearing 44's on their jerseys, Pride's Jeff Prouse (Brockport State) and Yankees Brandon Nylin (Onondaga College) hooked up into a pitching dual through the top of the sixth inning when the Yankees scored one run on a double to center field by Billy Sablinski (Westchester Community College) who then stole third base and scored on a sacrificed fly to right field.
  Pride got right back into the game in the bottom of the sixth when Bray Curreri (Eldred Central High School) doubled to left field and scored on a ground ball error at second base.
  Pitching again took over and the 1-1 tied game continued to the top of the ninth when the Yankees scored four runs to take a 5-1 lead off a single, safe at first on a bunt, another single, a stolen base, three walks with one resulting in a run and a balk which also brought in another run.
  Pride attempted a comback in the bottom of the ninth with a hit batter. three walks and three runs scoring on three passed balls getting by the Yankees catcher.  Two costly strike outs ended the game with the Yankees putting the 5-4 victory into their win column.
  Team advisory member  Jared Carrier when asked about the Pride's playoff hopes said, "we are on the outside looking in concerning the playoffs, " with the "top four teams from the nine team league advancing." 
  He added, "we would need to win at least six of our last eight games and get some help to have a shot at the playoffs."
  Long time HVCBL member, The Sullivan Spartans,  merged this season with the Pennsylvania based Northeast Pride and is comprised of players primarily from New York and Pennsylvania.  
                                      PHOTOS FROM THIS GAME
                                                              


                                                                                 
                                                                                    
                                   

                                                                                 

Golfing Highlights 7-11-14

A Family Golfing Tradition
                                               
 
  Family traditions run deep and strong in the game of golf and such is the case with Sullivan County's McNamara's golf course maintenance family.
  Last week we highlighted information about Patrick McNamara, the new golf course superintendent at the Town of Fallsburg Tarry Brae and Lochmor Golf Course.
  Leadership as a golf course superintendent has been a major part of this family and it all started as a post Army mechanic's job for Ray McNamara in 1957 at the former Homawack Lodge on Route 209 near Ellenville.
  As local golf history reveals Ray's three sons, Mike, Pat and Terry all began their golf course maintenance careers at the Homawck.
  When each of the boys turned 14 they went to work on the course doing work that did not involve using power tools but started out by raking bunkers, weeding and helping wherever they were needed.
  In addition to working on the course dad Ray thought the boys needed an appreciation of the game so he taught them to play.
  Mike, the oldest, is presently the superintendent at Grossinger's Country Club where he started as a seasonal employee at the age of 18, after already working for his dad for four years.
  Mike graduated from Delhi in 1977 and became an assistant at Grossinger's and after seven years became the superintendent in 1984.
  As we mentioned last week Patrick, before taking the superintendent's job at Tarry Brae and Lochmor was superintendent at Kutcher's. He, of course,  also worked with his father and also worked courses at Mohonk, Paupack  Hills, Swan Lake and Apple Greens.
  Terry, the youngest son, spend 10 years in the hotel technology business in Atlanta, Ga. and returned to Sullivan County and went to work for his brother, Mike at Grossinger's and also worked at the Mohonk House and held the superintendent's position at the former Pine's Hotel golf course.
  Dad Ray still works at the Big G (Grossinger's) as does Terry.
  Over the years this well-known golf course maintenance family always collaborated with each other on problems and projects and they always were able to lend equipment and expertise.
  Everyone at these golf resorts benefited from this family that shared their experience.
  The four McNamara's always possessed a strong interest in keeping up with the changes and challenges in golf course construction and maintenance and had many opportunities to add their imprints to the courses they worked at.
  This family of golf course maintenance experts have always been very supportive of professional organizations like the New York State Turfgrass Association and the Golf Course Superintendents Association.
  And yes, the family still gets together to play a friendly but competitive round of  golf ..... where there are no gimme putts.

 Ed's Outlook

   Several upcoming golf tournaments to report on this week.
   The Steve Lagoda Scholarship Golf Tournament will be  held August 25 at the Villa Roma golf course. This event will have a 1 p.m. shotgun start. A putting contest is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. Four person captain and  crew format.
  Contact Brian Starr, PO Box 115, Lake Huntington, NY 12752 or call 845-397-2939.
  The Roscoe Kiwanis Club's 23ed annual tournament is set for July 27 at the Tennanah Lake Golf & Tennis Club.  For information call 607-498-5000.
  The Lockmor LTGA Ladies League is holding a special "Goofy Golf" Disney Classics Ladies Invitational on Wednesday, July 23 starting with a 7:30 a.m. Continental breakfast and registration.
  Tee time is 8:30 with a 18-hole shotgun start featuring a format of 2 player best ball of foursome with handicaps. There will be prizes, raffles, free give aways and a special prize for the best costume.
  A portion of the proceeds will benefit The Allyson Whitney Foundation. For information call the Lochmor Golf Course at 845-434-1257.

  Ed Townsend is a PR Consultant to the sport of Golf. Ed writes and compiles the information for this column. If you have league and tournament information, shoot a hole-in-one or even shoot your age, let Ed know at 845-439-8177 or 845-866-0333, email at edwardctownsend@hotmail.com, fax at 845-205-4474. View this column and all of Ed's pictures at http://bght.blogspot.com We are also on Facebook and Twitter.

 The Golf Tip
 By Robert Menges

  In today's ever-changing golf game, most players are under the influence that if they hit the ball longer they will play better.
  Even though technology has increased how far the ball will travel, the scores are about the same.
  There is no doubt that is you hit the ball longer you should have less club to the green and be able to get the ball closer to the hole and make more putts.
  I believe this to be true, but you better be able to hit the shots on the green close to the pin. In order to hit the ball close, I feel it is important to carry three wedges in your golf bag. Most golfers have a pitching wedge that comes with the set. This club has about a 47-49 degrees of loft.
  You have a choice to make for the other two wedges. A gap wedge comes with about 50 to 53 degrees of loft and a lob wedge is about 60 to 64 degrees of loft. I would choose between these two clubs depending on how far you hit the ball.
  A lob wedge will save you shots around the green and a gap wedge will help you  with the in between yardages in the fairway. You should always carry a sand wedge that has 54-57 degrees of loft.
  Some touring Professionals will carry four wedges in their bag. The next time you play a round of golf, count how many strokes you take from 100 yards in to the hole. I think you find this will total about 60 percent of your score. When you are trying to improve your score, it is important to lower the number of shots you take close to the green. I think having three wedges in your bag will help you accomplish a lower score.
  Robert Menges is the golf professional at the Swan Lake Golf & Country Club, Mt. Hope Road, Swan Lake. He is available for private lessons and if you have a question or subject you would like covered, he can be reached at 845-292-0323 or by email at menges@hughes.net

Putting Tip
By Joseph Bermel Jr.

  A special key to good consistent putting is finishing the putting stroke.
  Most golfers do not finish and then they wonder why they are short of the hole.
  You start the stroke.......you must finish and hold the finish.
  Finishing means the putter head is a minimum 2 feet past the ball and this helps the momentum and the ball will roll end over end and will reach the hole.
  Joe Bermel is available for private lessons, goup, corporate, organizations and golf show/tournaments. His special edition DVD "How To Putt Well" and his Putting Calendar are available at 631-589-1384, at his Web site www.ThePuttingDoctor.com or by email at joe@theputtingdoctor.com

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

DUTCHESS COUNTY FAIR NEWS




ADVANCE SALE TICKETS PROVIDE BIG SAVINGS TO 2014 DUTCHESS COUNTY FAIR



Rhinebeck, NY .... Admission, carnival rides and Grandstand concert tickets are all available

online for the 2014 Dutchess County Fair at www.dutchessfair.com. Advance discount tickets

will also go on sale throughout the region at numerous locations starting July 13 and ending at

5pm on August 18. The one hundred sixty ninth  Dutchess County Fair starts its six-day run on

August 19.

            Adult admission tickets are sold in advance for $12 ($15 at the gate). Ride tickets are

sold for $10 for 20 rides.
           
            Advance tickets for both admission and rides are available at the following locations:

Adams Fairacre Farms in Poughkeepsie, Newburgh, Kingston, and Wappingers Falls; Agway

stories in Claverack, Chatham and Millerton; DeCicco's in Brewster; Food Town in Cold

Spring; Fresh Town (Food Town) in Amenia and Dover Plains; G.E Masten in Pleasant

Valley; Ginsberg's in Hudson; Hackett Farm Supply in Salt Point; Hannaford in Wappingers

Falls, Pawling, Highland, Kingston Plaza, Kingston (Ulster), Red Hook and Lagrange; Hudson

Valley Mall in Kingston; Macs Farm and Garden in Red Hook and New Paltz; Price

Chopper in Saugerties, Poughkeepsie, Hudson and Catskill. Stop and Shop in Hyde Park, New

Paltz, Hopewell Jct., Poughkeepsie (Burnett Blvd), Poughkeepsie (South Rd), Wappingers

Falls,Rhinebeck and Danbury, Ct. (Newtown Rd) and Danbury Ct ( Lake Avenue); Utter Brothers, Pawling ; and

Williams Lumber, Rhinebeck. Admission tickets only will be sold at the Rhinebeck Bank in

Hyde Park, Mid Hudson, South Road, Poughkeepsie, Red Hook and Rhinebeck.  Admission,  

ride and concert tickets can also be purchased at the Fairgrounds Office in Rhinebeck.

            Buying advance tickets for the Grandstand shows not only provides a significant savings

but also guarantees your admission to the performance. The 2014 concert lineup includes: Pop

singing sensations Cody Simpson and Coco Jones on Tuesday, August 19 at 7pm. Advance

tickets are $10 ( $15.00 the day of the show). On Wednesday, August 20, country stars, Randy

Houser and Eric Paslay perform at  7:30pm. Advance tickets are $25 ($30 day of show). Alumni

and winners of 'The Voice', Danielle Bradberry and the Swon Brothers appear Thursday,

August 21 and tickets in advance for the 7:30pm show are $15 ($20 day of show). Folk rockers

Simone Felice and The Felice Brothers appear on Friday, August 22 at 7pm and all seats are

free.

Saturdays thrill show of Bikes, Blades and Boards is also free of charge to fairgoers with

performances at 2:00pm and 6:30pm. Also featured on Saturday at Noon and 5pm is the

Dutchess County Sheriff’s K9 demonstrations.  Closing day, Sunday August 24 features the

Painted Pony Rodeo Championship Bull Riding at 2:00pm and 6:00pm. Show tickets for the

Painted Pony Rodeo are $10 for adults, $5 for children 5 to 12 and free admission for children

under 5. Admission to the fair is not included in any of the concert tickets and must be

purchased separately.                                                                   

New this year... a special promotion will entitle fairgoers to an adult admission of $7.00 on Tuesday and Thursday night after

5:00pm.  Seniors and Military with ID are admitted each day of the fair for $10. Children under 12 are admitted free each day.

Dutchess County Fair hours are 10am to 10pm Tuesday, August 19 through Sunday August 24. For more information go to

www.dutchessfair.com  or call 845-876-4000. 

                                                                                   




BINGHAMTON METS NEWS

Here & There 7-8-14

 Bird Feeder Defeats The Squirrel

                                                         


  Bird feeders are fun but when considering purchase of same human beings must become defensive and know what kind of feeder to purchase that will also defeat bird food theft by Mr. Squirrel.
  Conversation with the pet store manager where I buy my wild bird food revealed some interesting facts and statistics about bird feeder and how to give Mr. Squirrel a defeatist attitude.
  Interesting to learn that the invention of bird feeders came about when humans started living outside of the city in country surroundings and the desire to have wildlife around us.
  Through the study of birds we quickly learned how to attract birds that brought pleasure and this meant we had to know and provide the basic requirements of life....water and the right kind of bird food for the birds you want at your bird feeder.
  Had one bird feeder that blue jays and crows could get into so my latest feeder is for the smaller birds  and is constructed so the big birds and squirrel's can't get to the food.
  Just forgot...... if you like to watch the birds at your feeder don't place the feeder any closer than three feet from the window.
  Certain foods tend to attract certain birds.....I prefer the black oil sunflower seed and my finches along with other small birds provide lots of entertainment while eating.
  The colder weather  also brings more birds as in the spring and summer they have plenty of natural sources of food.
  Just got entertained by Mr. Squirrel the other day as he discovered he could come right up on my porch, jump up on the railing and ease over to my feeder hanging off the porch railing.
  He put on quite a show as every attempt he made to get to the food was defeated by the bars on the feeder (designed specifically for that purpose) 
  It took him a good 10 minutes to finally give up...... I'll give him an A for effort and an A + to the bird feeder designer.

 
 
 
 
 



 

Golfing Highlights 7-4-14

New Superintendent At Fallsburg Courses
                                                    
 

  The Tarry Brae and Lochmor Town of Fallsburg golf courses have a new superintendent.
  Patrick McNamara, 53, from Grahamsville took over the top golf course maintenance job this spring and continues to work in a job he grew up in.
  The McNamara name is a big part of a Sullivan County golf course maintenance family.
  In 1976 at the age of 15 Pat worked with his father (Ray) who at that time was superintendent at the Homowack Resort golf course on Route 209.
  He is a 1978 graduate of Tri-Valley Central School.
  Brothers Mike and Terry also worked part-time in the summer at the Homowack.
  A graduate of the University of Massachusetts Winter Turf Course, Patrick attends yearly golf course maintenance seminars and is a licensed Commercial Pesticide Application operator.
  He is a member of the Hudson Valley Golf Course Superintendents Association and the New York State Turf Grass Association.
  Patrick's career in this field includes work at the  Mohawk Mountain House course near New Paltz, the Pines Hotel course,  Wallenpaupack Hills course in Pennsylvania,  Swan Lake Golf and Country Club, Apple Greens near Highland and 16-years as superintendent at Kutcher's Country Club.
  In addition to his job as Golf Course Superintendent Pat also owns and operates a logging business called Mountain Grown Tree Service where he specializes in tree injection which enhances the health of the tree.
  Keeping golf courses in the best shape possible requires year around equipment maintenance during the winter months and manpower during the spring, summer and fall months.
  Superintendent McNamara at Tarry Brae supervises eight employees including two-part timers and at Lochmor seven employees including part timers.
  His family consists of wife Laura and daughter Cortney.
  Next week we will talk about family golf within the McNamara family and McNamara's Band, a golf course maintenance family tradition in the Catskill's.

Ed's Outlook

  At times it is difficult to understand that many professional golfers do not understand the rules of this game.
  Justin Rose was docked two strokes because his ball was believed to have moved at address on the 18th hole in the third round of the Players Championship.
  Under Rule 18-2b, the ball must be replaced, with a one-stroke penalty but because Rose did not replace the ball, he was given a two-stroke penalty.
  The ruling produced plenty of confusion as Rose feared the ball may have moved.
  Several replays later a view in high definition showed ball movement.
  After thinking about it overnight, rules officials concluded that the New Decision18-4 applied and under 50 times magnification in the truck it showed the ball moved a quarter of a dimple toward the toe of the club and he gets assessed an extra stroke penalty.
  Rose realizes that he should have called the rules official immediately if he felt the ball had moved and then he would have only been assessed one stroke by moving it back.

  Ed Townsend is a PR Consltant to the sport of golf. Ed writes and compiles the information for this column. If you have league or tournament information, shoot a hole-in-one or even shoot your age, let Ed know at 845-439-8177 or 845-866-0333, email at edwardctownsend@hotmail.com or fax at 8454-205-4474. View this column and all of Ed's pictures at http://bght.blogspot.com We are also on Facebook and Twitter.

Golf Tip
By Robert Menges

  Many things can lead to inconsistent putting....but distance and direction are the
 reasons we should always have at the top of our "How Can I Be More Consistent?" list.
  Distance is the biggest cause of inconsistency, because it equates to the "feel" of the putt and also ends up controlling the distance after impact.
  As we have all learned, more speed equals less break and less speed leads to more break.
  On the other side of the coin, direction is the control we have in getting the golf ball started in the right direction  before gravity and undulation take over the roll and path of the ball. Mixed in with all this is the factor that these two distinctions have to work together if we are to enjoy any success in putting.
  Another way of looking at this is to think of our hands as the rudder and the engine/propeller of a boat.
  The rudder of the boat controls the direction, while the engine/propeller generates the speed and distance..
  When putting, our lead hand is the rudder.....it's along for the ride, but it also makes sure you are staying square to the target. The trail hand, which is usually our dominant hand, is the engine/propeller and determines how far the ball goes.
  So, each "part" has it own function.....and a very important function....but one working without the other is either a boat going in circles (no rudder) or simply going nowhere (no engine).
  An important key to developing more reliability with our distance and direction is to minimize hand and wrist movement, which, in turn, will maximize feel and control.
  Robert Menges is the head golf professional at the Swan Lake Golf & Country Club, Mt. Hope Road, Swan Lake. He is available for private lessons and if you have a question or subject you would like covered, he can be reached at 845-292-0323 or via email at menges@hughes.net

 Putting Tip
 By Joseph Bermel Jr.

  Constant Speed is a mjor asset to every terrific putter and can never be overrated.
You feel the speed with your Eyes, Mind and Hands....."The Triangle."
  Your eyes see the distance between the ball and the hole, a signal is sent to your mind, then your mind sends a signal to the muscles in your right hand (or left hand if you are a lefty) as the pressure and amount of acceleration on the forward stroke for the distance you want the ball to travel.
  This definitely connects to the amount of back and thru distance.
  Joe Bermel is available for private lessons, group, corporate, organization and golf shows/tournaments. His special edition DVD "How To Putt Well" and his Golf Tip Calendar are available by calling 631-589-1384, at his Web Site www.ThePuttingDoctor.com or by email at joe@theputtingdoctor.com


Here & There Column

Power Plants-Coal Or Gas?

  New York State Electric & Gas (NYSEG) in a report centered around the conversion of the AES Cayuga coal-burning power plant in Lansing has stated that the use of coal to produce electricity in the  future is not an option.
  Jerry Goodenough of the Upstate New York Power Producers gave strong indications that NYSEG wants to convert the coal-burning plant to methane gas which would require a pipeline for methane gas transmission.
  Tompkins County Area Development President Michael Stamm when asked about this proposal and any health and safety impacts with this proposal noted, "it's complex and its a political issue and if our elected officials encourage fracking to support the conversion to gas, that is the democratic process."
  Goodenough said that Governor Andrew Cuomo's energy plan titled the New York Energy Highway says that they do not consider converting to electricity production based on non-fossil fuels and that Cuomo stated his support for converting from coal to gas-generated power across New York when announcing the re powering of a Dunkirk plant last December.
  An interesting note that could have a big effect on consumers in the future is that the AES Cayuga proposal suggests that NYSEG ratepayers subsidize the conversion project, estimated to be $90 million, rather than it be owner-financed.
  NYSEG is also pointing out that the existing coal-burning AES Cayuga plant can generate the required megawatts needed by upgrading the electric transmission lines which is already planned and estimated to cost $55 million.
  Like Stamm said........"its a political issue, " but one that is not friendly to the consumer in New York who continually face rising costs and increased tax rates.
  Will present or future power plants be powered by coal or methane gas?

Golfing Highlights


Legends Cup Features Ryder Cup Play

                                                        
         

  A condensed version of the PGA's "Ryder Cup" competition took place June 14 at the Roscoe Twin Village Golf Course featuring two teams with six golfers on each team.
  This first time event was arranged and managed by Twin Village Board of Directors Vice President Chuck Husson IV.
  Husson noted that team names were picked by the team captains and were chosen from members who have passed away.
  Team No. 1 was named after Charlie Barnes with team captain Jordan Tallman. Members of this team consisted of Ron Schulte, Pete DeVantier, Tyler Schmidt, Jesse Huggins and Tom Trask.
  Team No. 2 was named after Ray Pomeroy with team captain Chuck Husson IV. Members of this team consisted of Tom Ackerly, Chuck Husson III, Collin Tallman, Andy Bury and Kevin Green.
  The Ryder Cup play involves various (match play) competition between players selected from two teams.
  Unlike stroke play, in which the unit of scoring is the total number of strokes taken over one or more rounds of golf, match play scoring consists of individual holes won, halved or lost.
  On each hole, the most that can be gained is one point...golfers play as normal, counting the strokes taken on a given hole and the golfer with the lowest score on a given hole receives one point.
  If the golfers tie then the hole is halved.
  In this condensed version of play Session 1 consisted of three nine-hole stroke/four ball combo matches worth two points each.
  Results of this play saw Tyler Schmidt and Jordan Tallman defeating Chuck Husson III and Collin Tallman 1 1/2 points to 1/2 point in match number one. In match number two Ron Schulte and Jesse Huggins defeated Tom Ackerley and Keven Green 1 1/2 points to 1/2 point. March three saw Chuck Husson IV and Andy Bury defeating Pete DeVantier and Tom Trask 2 points to 0.
  At the completion of session one team Barnes and team Pomeroy each three points.
  In session two which consisted of three nine hole alternate shot match play matches worth one point each Husson III and Bury won their match, Husson IV and Green won, Jordan Tallman and  Huggins won with team Barnes now totaling four points to team Pomeroy's five points.
  The third and final session consisting of six nine hole match play singles matches with handicaps worth two points each saw Schulte and Bury halving their match taking one point each, Green defeated Trask to take two points, Husson IV defeated Huggins for two points, Jordan Tallman defeated Husson III for two points, Collin Tallman defeated DeVantier for two points and Schmidt defeated Ackerly for two points.
  With 12 total points team Pomeroy defeated team Barnes 12-9 to win the 2014 Legends Cup.
  DeVantier won the closest to the pin on hole No. 6 and Ackerly closest to the pin on hole No. 8
  Tournament players enjoyed lunch catered by Anna May Husson and Casey Talllman of Casey's Place.
  All monies raised minus lunch expenses went to the Twin Village Golf Course.
  Husson IV indicated that future plans are to expand this yearly tournament.

 Ed's Outlook

    Rory McIlrory announced his engagement to professional tennis player Caroline Wozniaki on New Years Eve.
  What happened next throws a curve ball that only a gofer could hit.
  Two days after the pair had sent out wedding invitations, McIlrory announces that he realized that he was not ready for marriage and was splitting from Caroline.
  Now comes the interesting point..... when questioned by the media if he would be able to concentrate enough to play in the BMW PGA Championship tournament McIlroy said, "I made a commitment to be here," and "once I give my word I'm not going to go back on that."
  All we can say about that is.......... yeah sure....tell that one to Caroline and her family.........poor form I would say because you can't keep your word on a case to
case basis.

  Ed Townsend is a PR Consultant to the sport of golf. Ed writes and compiles the information for this column. If you have league and tournament information , shoot a hole-in-one or even shoot your age, let Ed know at 845-439-8177, 845-866-0333, email at edwardctownsend@hotmail.com or fax at 845-205-4474. View this column and all of Ed's photos at http://bght.blogspot.com. We are also on Facebook and Twitter.

The Golf Tip
By Robert Menges

  Here's a real simple exercise you can do anytime on the course to regain your rhythm.
  Simply turn a driver or wood up the other way and swing.
  Doing this will make the club very, very light and it will change the feelings that you've been having with the club.
  Once you've had a number of swings like this, I suggest you grip the club normally and go back to swinging it the way you normally would. But doing this drill will help you to feel the clubhead and that's critical in the golf swing.
  Have you heard the expression "Swing The Clubhead?" Well, if you have or you haven't.....just do it.
  Swing the clubhead and not the club. Let the clubhead do the swinging and feel the power you get without forcing it. Keep turning the clubhead over so you can get the feeling of the clubhead more often.
  You'll soon regain your rhythm and with it will return your confidence.
  Robert Menges is the head golf professional at the Swan Lake Golf & Country Club, Mt. Hope Road, Swan Lake. He is available for private lessons and if you have a question or subject you would like covered, he can be reached by phone at 845-292-0323 or via email at menges@hughes.net

The Putting Tip
By Joe Bermel Jr.

  The miscue of golfers is that on short putts, especially, they decelerate on the forward stroke.
  Golfers need to do the exact opposite, that is accelerate on the forward stroke.
  Short putting is from a tap in up to 6 feet, the "holy grail" of putting.
  Paramount to be proficient here......you second putt on every hole is between a tap in and up to 6 feet.
  How many of these 18 you make will determine your final score.
  Joe Bermel is available for private lessons, group, corporate, organization and golf shows-tournaments. His special edition DVD "How To Putt Well" and his 2014 Tip of the Month calendar are available by calling 631-589-1384, a his Web site www.ThePuttingDoctor.com or by email at joe@theputtingdoctor.com