Monday, August 29, 2011

Here & There Column 8-30-11



Sedaka Still Brings The House Down


If you missed Neil Sedaka and the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra August 21 at Bethel Woods Center For The Arts you missed one of the greatest musicians (singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and record producer) ever to grace the Bethel Woods stage.
I state this because of the great pure voice he still possesses at the age of 72 and the talent he displays at the piano.
Born in Brooklyn on March 13, 1939, Neil in 1958 met his wife, Leba Strassberg who's parents owned the Ester Manor near Monticello and Neil was part of the after-dinner entertainment the hotel provided its guests.
His hit songs including "Calendar Girl", "Happy Birthday Sweet Sixteen" and "Breaking Up Is Hard To Do" were part of the musical gifts he shared with the Bethel Woods audience who brought him back for two encores.
Many in the audience often sang along with Neil to their favorites of years past and clapped their hands while he sang "The Saints Go Marching In."
Sedaka also offered his first piano concerto which he noted incorporated all of the ethic groups in New York City.
Neil said that with the invasion of the The Beatles in the mid 1960's this was "not good" for his career as from the beginning of 1964 until the end of 1966 only three of his singles even made it on the Hot 100 list.
Although Sedaka's stature as a recording artist was at a low ebb in the late 1960s, he was able to maintain his career through songwriting.
Great singers with multi-musical talents like Sedaka always come back and in the mid to late 1970s he started the second phase of his career and included his original version of the hit song "Love Will Keep Us Together."
We could go on and on about the great Neil Sedaka who proved to the Bethel Woods audience that his inspired countless hits for the past 50 years continue to stand the test of time.
The New Jersey Symphony Orchestra in making its first trip to Sullivan County was also outstanding clearly showing that it is comprised of some of the country's finest musicians under the directorship of Conductor Laureate Neeme Jarvi.


CAPTION FOR ATTACHED PHOTO


The great Neil Sedaka, left, and New Jersey Symphony Orchestra Conductor Laureate Neeme Jarvi share a brief moment at their August 21 concert at Bethel Woods.


Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Golfing Highlights Column 8-26-11

The 15th green at Lochmor presents several hazards for golfers to avoid. On the left of the green is Morningside Lake, a small stream in front of the green and water in also in back of the green.


Lochmor GC Get's Golf Digest Rating


Golf Digest magazine has given the Town of Fallsburg Municipal Lochmor Golf Course a three and one-half star rating and a major reason why is the total automated water system for the tees, fairways and greens.
The Mitchell-designed course was officially opened by the town in 1961 and today the 18-hole 6,550 yard course is popular for open play and league play plus the scenery on the back nine (holes 10-18) is beautiful and offers a challenge to most golfers.
In a recent outing we found the condition of this course to be outstanding.
Glenn Sonnenschein is the head PGA Pro, Michael Decker is the Assistant Head Pro, Clark Bartolomew is the Golf Course Superintendent with William Henkelman Assistant Superintendent. Club house pro-shop manager is Frank McCoy.
Rates at Lochmor include the weekday lunch special which includes 18-holes of golf with a cart and lunch. After 1 and 3 p.m. the golf and cart rate is reduced.
The golf course can be reached by calling 434-1257 or at their web site at http://www.lochmorgolf.com/
The course offers four sets of tees which make the course playable to all caliber of golfers. The greens are nicely groomed and tend to be a little fast.
This week we outline for you the back nine from the black tees and we'll define holes (10-18). Yardage on the back nine runs 3,360 yards.
Hole No. 10 is a 280-yard par 4 with trees darting the left side of the fairway. Best to take your drive left center. Traps are on the left and front sides of this green.
Hole No. 11 is a 201-yard par 3. Club selection off the tee is your key to nailing that birdie or par.
Hole No. 12 is a 580-yard par 5, the longest hole on this golf course. Fairway starts out straight with a dogleg left and the fairway then runs uphill. Just prior to the dogleg there is water which runs across most of the fairway. The green has a trap on the right side and the right rear. Avoiding the water running across the fairway will determine your final score here.
Hole No. 13 is a 157-yard par 3 with trees on the right side of the fairway. Traps on the right and left side of this green.
Hole No. 14 is a 418-yard par 4 with a dogleg left. The beautiful Morningside Lake is on the left and its about 170-yards to water running across the fairway off the tee. The lake runs completely on the left side of the fairway. A trap near the green is left front. Keep from going over this green on your approach shot.
Hole No. 15 is 1 501-yard par 5 with the lake on the left so best to take your ball to the right center in this fairway. There is a small stream running in front of this green and a trap on the right side of the green. The approach shot and club selection is the key to success on this hole. If you go too far over this green there is also water.
Hole No. 16 is a 409-yard par 4 with a dogleg right. An open fairway with trees on the right off the tee and in the second half of this fairway there are trees on the left. There is a trap on the right side of the green. Hole No. 17 is a 423-yard par 4 with the fairway sloping left to right. Open fairway and some trees on the left and right sides. All depending where the flag is on this hole but overall its best to take your approach shot left center as the green slopes left to right. It might take a couple of rounds to figure our the best way to putt on this green.
Hole No. 18 is a 390-yard par 4 with a fairway trap on the right and traps left, center and right on the green.
On your next golf outing be sure to take in the beauty and great golfing opportunities at the Lochmor Golf Course.


The Golf Tip
By Robert Menges

The Hybrid Chip Shot
As many of you avid golfers have probably noticed, more and more golfers are putting a hybrid, or utility club in their bag. They are replacing the three, four and five irons for an easier club to hit.
The hybrid irons are easier to hit because, they offer the golfer more surface area to strike the ball with. Also, these clubs are much better at getting through the rough. This is because they glide through the rough instead of getting stuck in the grass as an iron would.
Many golfers are also using the hybrid club to chip around the green. If you have a shot where you only have to loft the ball in the air a short distance, and then let the ball roll on the green much like a putt, this is a very effective way to accomplish this shot.
First you must set up in a normal chipping stance. Keep your feet close together with 70 percent of your weight on your forward foot. Place your hand and arms slightly ahead or forward of the ball. When you make the stroke, attack it like you are hitting a putt. Try to let just your arms and shoulders do the work, without flipping or using your hands. You must keep your lower body and head still to avoid sending the ball in a poor direction. Try to pick a spot on the green where you want the ball to land and let the ball roll as much as possible to the hole.
Remember, always try to practice this shot on the chipping green before you go out to play.
As with every new shot you try to use in golf, you want the shot to save you strokes not add more to your score.
Robert Menges is the head golf professional at the Swan Lake Golf & Country Club, Mt. Hope Road, Swan Lake. He is available for private lessons and if you have a question or subject you would like covered, he can be reached by phone at 292-0323 or via e-mail at menges@hughes.net

The Putting Doctor
Putting Tip
By Joe Bermel


Tired of 3-putting?
Tired of constantly missing 3,4 & 5 foot putts?
Joe Bermel is a Long Island native who started teaching in 1981 and earned a reputation for making putt after putt in the New York State leg of the old Compaq World.
At the age of 64 he tied for the title in 1996 and is now a fixture at golf shows up and down the East Coast.
"What sets me apart is no other golf professional will stand in front of an audience and do a putting presentation, and putt the ball in again and again," said Bermel, who's got the convictions of an televangelist and the marketing sense of a infomercial pitchman.
Joe Bermel is a special God-given talent to do this.....and he does it very, very well.
Want to get help for your putting, Joe Bermel is available for private lessons, group, corporate, organization and golf shows-tournaments. His special edition DVD "How To Putt Well" is available by calling 631-589-1384, at his Web site, http://www.theputtingdoctor.com/ or my email at joe@theputtingdoctor.com


This column is written by Ed Townsend, a consultant to the amateur and professional sport of golf and to several golf writers associations. If you have a topic that you believe would make good reading or have league standings and tournament information, Ed can be reached by phone at 845-439-8177 and by e-mail at edwardctownsend@hotmail.com For a much more expanded version of this golf column, please visit our Web site at http://www.http//bght.blogspot.com This column is also available on Facebook.
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Here & There Column 8-23-11

Pressure On High School Athletes

One would never think that high school coaches would ever think about putting pressure on students to play for their team.
The interest in sports and the skills it takes to participate in the sport has always been a high level priority for this writer, but, what we have seen and heard recently from a number of parents in different Sullivan County school districts is the peer pressure put on athletes from coaches who push the issue a little too far to get this or that boy-girl athlete to participate in a sport.
Take the many weight-training programs for all sports that continue to grow more and more popular because every athlete faces pressure to keep up with his or her counterparts.
There use to be in days past some quite time after one sport wrapped up and the next sport started but today, as every overextended parent knows, there is no lull time in sports.
Summer months use to be reserved for baseball but we witnessed this past summer that AAU basketball practice and sometimes twice a week games can keep active baseball and basketball players going full speed in July and August.
It's easy to understand from where these participating basketball coaches are coming from but the problem for the players, and therefore for parents, is the conflicting pressures imposed by coaches.
Most high school coaches officially support well-rounded players and sincerely encourage cross-training by playing another sport.
The pressure to compete year-round has grown as coaches insist that players continue playing club or recreational league sports during the off-season.
It's a demand on families' time and money that is widening the gap between those who can participate and those who can't or choose not to.
The truth is that players do need more than high school competition to be a good high school athlete.
We have seen it right here in Sullivan County that teams are built with players who are more than just athletes....they bring established skills to their teams and it simply comes down to the fact that families with greater resources and time can improve their children's chances.
We don't like to hear about coaches attempting to put pressure on players who don't want to play and that it's OK to catch a breath and rest or put in some training for a sport they like more.....in the end that's part of the pleasure of sports as well.


Golfing Highlights Column 8-19-11

The 209-yard fourth hole at the Town of Fallsburg Lochmor Golf Course is a par 3 and offers a beautiful view in the background of Mornngside Lake.


Lochmor Was Originally Only 12 Holes


In a recent visit to the Town of Fallsburg Lochmor Golf Club some interesting history was revealed to us about this present 18-hole golf facility.
Lochmor was first built in the early 1950s by the hotels that were in the area and originally it did not start out as a town owned and operated facility.
The course originally had about 12 holes when the Town of Fallsburg took over the project in 1958 and the Mitchell-designed course was completed with 18-holes by town employees.
The newly designed course was officially open for play in 1961.
Today the 18-hole 6,550 yard course is popular for open play and league play.
Par for the front nine s 35 and par for the back nine is 36 for a total par of 71.
A total automated water system for the greens, fairways and tees has helped the course receive a three and one-half star rating from Gold Digest magazine.
We found the cart paths to be in excellent condition and the white sand in the traps are a definite plus.
Glenn Sonnenschein is the head PGA Pro, Michael Decker is the Assistant Head Pro, Clark Bartholomew is the Golf Course Superintendent with William Henkelman Assistant Superintendent. Club house pro-shop manager is Frank McCoy.
Rates at Lochmor include the weekday lunch special which includes 18-holes of golf with a cart and lunch. After 1 and 3 p.m. the golf and cart rates go down.
The golf and lunch special is very popular.
The golf pro shop at Lochmor offers a nice variety of golf equipment and accessories.
The golf course can be reached by calling 434-1257 or at their web site at http://www.lochmorgolf.com/
The course offers four set of tees for each hole which makes the course playable to all caliber of golfers. Black tees are recommended for men with a 0-8 handicap, green tees for men with up to a 20 handicap, gold tees for men with 21-25 handicap and ladies with a 0-10 handicap and yellow tees for men with handicap of 36 and above and ladies 11 and up. We found this golf course in excellent shape and very well maintained. Greens are nicely groomed and tend to be a little fast. A great job by the grounds crew.
This week we will take you through the first nine holes from the black tees. Yardage on the front nine runs 3,190 yards
Hole No. 1 is a 334-yard par 4 and pretty much straight. Take your tee shot left center. The green has 3 traps.
Hole No. 2 is a 362-yard par 4 with a slight dogleg left. Stay center of the fairway. Traps are left and right of this green and keep your approach shot from going over this green. Hole No. 3 is a 388-yard par 4 and fairway runs pretty much straight. Trees are on both sides of the fairway.
Hole No. 4 is a 209-yard par 3 with the beautiful Morningside Lake in the background. Proper club selection here can get you your par. Traps are left and right of this green.
Hole No. 5 is a 467-yard par 4 with a dogleg left. There is a trap on the left side and water on the right of this green. A nice golf hole with opportunities for a birdie after a good tee shot.
Hole No. 6 is a 495-yard par 5 with water off the tee and a dogleg right. Take your tee shot right center. Proper club selection on your second shot can get your ball up and on this elevated green for an eagle or birdie. Traps are left and right on this green.
Hole No. 7 is a 380-yard par 4. Fairway is pretty much straight and the second half of the fairway runs uphill. Traps are left and right on this green.
Hole No. 8 is a 390-yard par 4. Stay in the center of fairway on this hole. There is a pond about 200-yards on the left. Trap is on the left side of the green.
Hole No. 9 is a 165-yard par 3. Again club selection is the key to your birdie or par.
Next week we will outline the back nine.

Golfing Tip
By Robert Menges


Buried Bunker Lies.
To blast the ball out of the sand, your club needs to swing more up and down to create a steeper angle of attack.
To help illustrate, have someone stand (or picture a wall) several feet behind the ball. In the backswing, hinge your wrists early to get the club up more, avoiding the person (or wall).
Also make note of the length of the backswing. It should almost be a full swing. In order to create enough speed and energy to blast the ball out of the sand, avoid taking a short and /or low backswing.
From this position, you will be able to swing the club into the sand on the downswing. It's imperative that you strike down into the sand 1 to 2 inches behind the ball and finish with the club low to the ground.
Amateur golfers often try to scoop or help lift the ball out of the sand. This usually results in the club hitting the sand too far behind the ball and either missing it completely or taking too much sand and leaving the ball in the bunker. Or, the club misses the sand and strikes the top of the ball, resulting in a topped shot that can go anywhere.
Robert Menges is the head golf professional at the Swan Lake Golf & Country Club, Mt. Hope Road, Swan Lake. He is available for private lessons and if you have a question or subject you would like covered, he can be reached by phone at 292-0323 or via email at menges@hughes.net

The Putting Doctor
Putting Tip
By Joe Bermel


Here is one of the best putting drills since "sliced bread was invented.
Drill # 2..... A Quadrant Drill
1. Take 1 golf ball.
2. On practice green, establish on one hole at four foot distance only.
3. Ist putt straight uphill.
4. 2nd putt straight downhill.
5. 3rd putt right edge slight right to left.
6. 4th putt left edge slight left to right.
Every golfer has these 4 puts many times every round. Do this drill again and again.
Make yourself make 3 consecutive putts at each quadrant.
This will make you a better 2 putt per hole average.
Joe Bermel is available for private lessons, group, corporate, organization and golf shows-tournaments. His special edition DVD "How To Putt Well" is available by calling 631-589-1384, at his Web site http://www.theputtingdoctor.com/ or by email at joe@theputtingdoctor.com


TVGC Party
Fund Raiser


The Roscoe Twin Village Golf Club annual Fund Raiser will be held Sunday, October 2 at The Rockland House from 1-4 p.m.
Tickets are $100 each and entitles one person and a guest to three hours of open bar, a buffet, music and a chance to win cash prizes amounting to $2,500 for 1st prize, $1,500 for 2ed prize, $1,000 for 3ed prize, $500 for 4th prize and five 5th prizes for $100 each.
Early bird special purchase tickets prior to September 26 are eligible for an additional five $200 cash prizes.
Ticket purchase and information is available from Chuck Husson at 607-498-5557.


This column is written by Ed Townsend, a consultant to the amateur and professional sport of golf and to several golf writers associations. If you have a topic that you believe would make good reading or have league standings and tournament information, Ed can be reached at 845-439-8177, by e-mail at edwardctownsend@hotmail.com For a much more expanded version of this golf column, please visit the Web site, http://bght.blogspot.com/ This column is also available on Facebook.

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Here & There Column 8-16-11



Alpaca's are always popular at the Bethel Woods Harvest Festivals


Alpaca's Open Harvest Festivals September 4

One of the greatest additions to fun in the early Fall months here in Sullivan County are the Harvest Festivals at Bethel Woods.
It's difficult at times to believe that this year marks the thirteenth anniversary of the Harvest Festival, an annual event celebrating the bounty, talent, and beauty of Sullivan County and surrounding areas. Over the years, the festival has grown from a small farmer's market with a handful of vendors and a few guest musicians, to a full festival featuring close to 100 vendors each week as part of the farmer's market, craft village and festival food areas. The Festival also presents a diverse craft village, festival foods, barbecue, vegetarian, Italian ices, kettle corn, live music, children's area with educational programming, corn and hay mazes, arts and crafts workshops, pony rides along with , themed events each week.
A sense of community is reflected throughout the Harvest Festival. The corn and hay mazes are operated by volunteer organizations that are able to benefit from this fund raising opportunity.
The Festival occurs every Sunday 11am - 4 pm, September 4 through October 9, rain or shine. Admission is FREE and Parking is $2.00 per car. The $2.00 per car parking was implemented several years ago to help offset costs to operate the Festival, and permits Bethel Woods to continue to present this important community event quality event.
The events scheduled this year include September 4 LaMantequilla Alpaca Fiesta, September 11 3rd annual Airing of the Quilts, September 18 Earth Day-Live well be well, September 25 Explore the Arts-a day of local art, music, theater and dance, October 2 Chili Day in October and October 9 Rustic Craft Show.
We congratulate the organizers of the Bethel Woods Harvest Festivals for bringing back the Alpaca Fiesta September 4. We urge everyone to pencil in this event on their calendar and learn the many interesting facts about Alpaca's, Alpaca fashions, live alpaca's will be on display, there are many exhibits including spinners and weavers who are interesting to watch and talk to. A boutique will offer scarves, shawls, gloves, hats, jackets, dresses, skirts, sweaters and teddy bears. Complimented by music, food and wine this event is a festival favorite to kick off the harvest season. The John Slaver Trio will perform and there is a community performance by The Janice Center.
Additional information on the festivals can be obtained at http://www.bethelwoodscenter.org/
Get out and enjoy these special Sullivan County fall events.......winter is not far behind.


Sunday, August 14, 2011

Thunderheads With BMets

Sullivan County Thunderheads team at the Aug. 12 Binghamton Mets Minor League baseball game. From the left are, third base coach Frank Exner, left fielder Christian Reynolds, center fielder Cody Exner, right fielder Doug Carter, third baseman Alex Brown, short stop Rodney "Taylor" Jester, second baseman Matt McPhillips, first baseman Andrew Exner, catcher John Anzano, pitcher Andrew Cross, first base coach Paul Exner and general manager Ed Townsend.



Joining the Sullivan County Thunderheads for a team photo at Binghamton Mets NYSEG Stadium are Binghamton Mets players, standing, from the left, right fielder Raul Reyes, pitcher Rhiner Cruz, second baseman Jon Malo and pitcher Brad Holt. Thunderheads kneeling, l to r, are Christian Reynolds, Cody Exner, Doug Carter, Alex Brown, Rodney "Taylor" Jester, Matt McPhillips, Andrew Exner, John Anzano, Brad Dreher and Andrew Cross.




The Public Address announcer calls to the playing field Binghamton Mets short stop Niuman Romero, left, followed by Thunderheads short stop Rodney "Taylor" Jester.



Enjoying some fun time with the Binghanton Mets Mascot are Sullivan County Thunderheads players, from the left, Christian Reynolds, Doug Carter and Matt McPhillips.



Sullivan County Thunderheads catcher John Anzano enjoys a special moment with Binghamton Mets catcher Dusty Ryan.





TAKING THE FIELD WITH THE BMETS


BINGHAMTON--Taking the field in their full uniform with the Minor League Double A Binghamton Mets (BMets) was the highlight of the evening August 12 as the Sullivan County Thunderheads 17/18 & under boys summer traveling baseball team met their counterparts on the diamond at NYSEG Stadium.
Attending the BMets game against the Richmond Flying Squirrels were 36 Sullivan County residents which included 10 regular lineup players from the Catskill Hudson Bank sponsored Thunderheads team along with their General Manager Ed Townsend, third base coach Frank Exner and first base coach Paul Exner.
Prior to the playing of the national anthem the stadium public address announcer acknowledged and welcomed the Thunderheads and proceeded with the two teams lineups," for the Mets second base Jon Malo and Matt McPhillips for the Thunderheads, " for the Mets center fielder Matt den Dekker and Cody Exner for the Thunderheads, for the Mets left fielder Brahiam Maldonado and Christian Reynolds for the Thunderheads, for the Mets first baseman Allan Dykstra and Andrew Exner for the Thunderheads, for the Mets catching Dusty Ryan and John Anzano for the Thunderheads, for the Mets third baseman Eric Campbell and Alex Brown for the Thunderheads, for the Mets right fielder Raul Reyes and Josh Carter for the Thunderheads, for the Mets short stop Niuman Romero and Rodney Jester for the Thunderheads and pitching for the Mets Robert Carson and Andrew Cross and Brad Dreher for the Thunderheads."
A number of picture opportunities took place for the Thunderheads while sharing the spotlight with the BMets players mascot and staff.
A special highlight of the evening was when the public address announcer acknowledged that Thunderheads pitcher Brad Dreher was also a member of the Livingston Manor Central School Wildcats varsity baseball team that won the New York State Class D Championship June 12 of this year at the Binghamton NYSEG stadium.
The manager and coaching staff acknowledged that the trip to the BMets game was in part both a thank you to the players and their families for the 2011 season and their hard work, cooperation and participation in league play with the New York Elite Baseball Program which is affiliated with the Continental Amateur Baseball Association.
The Thunderheads type of summer traveling league baseball "leads to great experience, player growth and produces better baseball skills for local high school junior varsity and varsity baseball players next spring," acknowledged coach Frank and Paul Exner.
The Sullivan County contingent and players enjoyed many of the traditional baseball park refreshments including hot dogs, hamburgers, ice cream, popcorn and soda during the 6-2 Mets loss and the night out at a ballgame was topped off with a great fireworks display at the end of the game.

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Friday, August 12, 2011

Golfing Highlights Column 8-12-11

Villa Roma PGA Golf Professional Matt Kleiner


Matt Kleiner Makes A Difference


Any great golf course has to have excellent management to keep it that way.
Certainly this is the case at the Villa Roma Golf Club where PGA Golf Professional Matt Kleiner heads up a staff for what Golf Digest has called, "A Little Slice of Heaven."
Matt started playing golf in high school as a sophomore and kept improving his game. He became the team's number one player in his senior year at Calhoun High in Merrick. After turning pro in 1979, he played on the Florida Mini Tour Circuit from 1979 to 1985. He was a teaching professional at Glen Cove Golf Club in Glen Cove from 1979-1980 and from 1984 to 1985.
Matt met his wife, Jill, in 1984 at the GlenCove Golf Club and became head professional at the Villa Roma Resort in April 1985 while the course was still under construction
Matt is described by golfers as an excellent teacher and provides lessons by appointment.
He has 20-plus years at the Villa Roma and has previously indicated that after turning 50 he is looking to compete in Senior PGA Club Pro Tournaments.
Keeping the golf course tees, fairways and greens in beautiful playing condition is the responsibility of golf course superintendent Jeffrey Coccodrilli.
This par 71 course has a total yardage of 6,458 from the black tees.
This golf facility offers a well equipped Pro Shop, a driving range, putting greens and practice facilities.
Last week we outlined the front nine.
This week we look at the back nine with a total yardage from the black tees of 3,275. The back nine is longer and more challenging but rewards solidly struck shots.
The back nine with a par of 36 features five par 4's, two par 5's and two par 3's.
Hole No. 10 is a 385-yard par 4 with a tree lined fairway that opens up after the tee shot. The fairway slopes downhill and the key shot here is off the tee slightly off center to the left side of the fairway. There is water some 20 to 30 yards in front of this green and a trap on the left side of the green. A good wedge shot puts you in play for a birdie or par.....a real nice golf hole for the start of the back nine.
Hole No. 11 is a 545-yard par 5, the longest hole on this course. It takes a good tee shot to keep you away from the marsh wet area located center-right off the tee, Keep the tee shot center or left center in the fairway which slopes right to left. Keep is straight and this long hole rewards you with a par.
Hole No,. 12 is a 357-yard par 4 with a dogleg left and the fairway running uphill to an elevated green. Keep you tee shot left center for a good second shot to the green. A trap is located on the right front side of the green.
Hone No. 13 is a 174-yard par 3 which requires accuracy and good club selection. The tee is elevated high above the green so it is an all downhill shot. . Traps are left and right of the green. We really like this hole and your tee shot will determine your birdie or par.
Hole No. 14 is a 332-yard par 4 with the first part of the fairway sloping downhill and a pond confronting golfers off the tee. Keep your tee shot firm and to the left center of the fairway to avoid a fairway trap on the right. The second half of the fairway slopes uphill to the green, which has a trap on the right front section.
Hole No. 15 is a 513-yard par 5 with a dogleg right. Traps are on the left and right side of the green.
Hole No. 16 is a 430-yard par 4 with an open fairway. Best play here is to the left side of the fairway. There is a trap on the right front section of the green. A nice par 4 here is reachable for many.
Hole No. 17 is a 180-yard par 3 and the tee shot must go over a large pond. Take the water out of play and select the right club for putting the ball in the center of the green and you will have your par 3.
Hole No. 18 is a 435-yard par 4 and some decision-making is in order for the tee shot. The fairway runs slightly with a dogleg right and there is a pond about 195-yards off the tee. It's about a 240-yard long tee shot to clear the pond so many golfers prefer to lay up in front of the pond. A nicely hit fairway shot from in front of the pond puts you in a good position for the par 4. There are traps left and right of the green. A few good decisions here makes this an outstanding golf hole.
The pro shop can be reached for reservations and information at 887-5097. The course Web site is http://www.villaroma.com/

The Golf Tip
By Robert Menges


Being A Good Mudder:
Invariably at one time or another, some moisture is going to fall on us while we are enjoying a tour of the golf course.
Some advice for playing in the rain is important because playing in the rain is full of distractions. It can become a distinct advantage for players gifted with powers of concentration stronger than their physical abilities.
With the assumption that you at least have your rain suit handy, here are a few extra arrows for your wet quiver:
* Have you tried Latex gloves? Rubber on rubber doesn't slip. Pulling them out at just the right time can be fun too. I like the yellow-colored ones the best. Naturally, it takes a plop, but you can do it. The "rain gloves" made by several manufacturers are another option if you lack some chutzpah.
* Wear you contact lenses, if you have them. It's tough to hit the ball when you're seeing three of them because of the raindrops on your glasses.
* Bring several towels. They'll come in handy for a variety of reasons.
* Bring several hats. In spite of the Redford/Newman glorification of "Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head," many golfers can't hack the drips.
* Re-read the casual water rule.
* Always dry your ball and your putter blade before making the stroke.
* Remember shots out of the wet sand always go farther.
* Bring a baggie for your score card. It's nice to show your opponents how badly you "out-mudded" them once you return to the 19th hole.
Robert Menges is the golf pro at the Swan Lake Golf & Country Club, Mt. Hope Road, Swan Lake. He is available for private lessons and if you have a question you would like covered, he can be reached at 845-292-0323 or via e-mail at menges@hughes.net


The Putting Doctor
Putting Tips
By Joe Bermel


In putting I link organization with strategy.
The strategy component is easier than you might think, involving
A. picking a distance based on the current realistic skill from which a golfer can reasonably attempt a one-putt, say 10 to 12 feet
B. With all putts longer than say, 12 feet, the thought is to get the first putt close enough to the hole to get a 2-putt result.
Remember, 2-putting is good putting for the average golfer.
Joe Bermel is available for private lessons, group, corporate, organization and golf-shows-tournament. His special edition DVD "How To Putt Well" is available by calling 631-589-1394, at his web site http://www.theputtingdoctor.com/ or by email at joe@theputtingdoctor.com

McMichael Memorial
August 28 At Villa Roma


The Kathy McMichael Memorial 3rd annual golf tournament will be played Sunday, August 28 with tee off at 1 p.m.
This scramble outing for men and women will be held at the Villa Roma Golf & Country Club with a $75 per player fee which includes 18 holes of golf with cart, dinner, prizes, contests and raffles.
Funds raised go directly to the Kathy McMichael Memorial Foundation which helps those in need.
Contact Jeffrey Molusky at 845-702-2373 or 570-224-5027 or at molusky21@hotmail.com


This column is written by Ed Townsend, a public relations consultant to the amateur and professional sports of golf and to several bowling writers associations. If you have a topic that would make good reading, or have golf scores, standings or tournament information, Ed can be reached by calling 845-439-8177 or by sending an e-mail to edwardctownsend@hotmail.com For more complete coverage Visit out Web Page at http://bght.blogspot.com/ We are also available on Facebook.

NEW GOLF TOURNEY IS BORN

Troy Kirchner helped to create and design the layout for the new par-3 "Fun Event" tournament at the Roscoe Twin Village Golf Course


Ralph Kircher helped implement the disign and concept for the new par 3 tournament at the Roscoe Twin Village Golf Club.


The first hole in the redesigned par 3 Roscoe Twin Village Golf Course "Fun Event" August 7 was this 105-yard shot through the trees and over a pond from the end of the pond on hole No. 1 to the ninth green.


Jean Knickerbocker, left, and son Thomas Knickerbocker, scored the winning score of 51 in the August 7th 18-hole par-3 golf "Fun Event" at the Roscoe Twin Village Golf Club.


NEW GOLF TOURNEY IS BORN

Redesigning an existing 9 hole golf course into an 18-hole par 3 course where wedge shots, nine irons and accurate putting led to success resulted in drawing 40 golfers to a fun filled different type of golf tournament August 7 at the Roscoe Twin Village Golf Course (TVGC).
Behind everything that becomes a success are brilliant minds and the two golfers who drew up and developed the idea for this type of golf tournament included retired Roscoe automobile dealer Ralph Kirchner and his grandson former TVGC manager Troy Kirchner.
Designed as a fund raiser for improvements at the 9-hole TVGC Ralph Kirchner drew up and distributed some fliers which advertised a low entry fee of $18 per golfer plus a cart fee and cash prizes for the winners.
The tournament was to have featured a putting contest on the 9th green, a bunker contest from the back 9th green trap to the 9th green and a longest drive contest on hole No. 1 but heavy rains at the conclusion of the tournament prevented these events from taking place.
Ten foursomes was the limit for this event and 40 golfers competed in events like using tennis balls instead of golf balls on hole No. 4 from the ladles tee to the regular green and if any golfer thinks this would be easy then take a tennis ball and see how far you can drive it down the fairway with your driver. We witnessed good golfers scoring a 5 on this 120-yard hole......putting with a tennis ball worked a lot easier then trying to drive the ball off a tee with a driver.
Taking a tee shot from a sand bunker to the 5th green some 35-yards away was another challenge in this tournament designed as a "fun event" by Kirchner.
Right handed golfers teeing off with a left handed club and left handed golfers teeing off with a right handed club on the 8th hole saw a number of miffed shots and throw in a bonus with one of the most picturesque par 3's featuring a tee box at the end of the pond on hole number one with golfers having to thread a tee shot through a narrow opening between four trees and over a pond to the ninth green some 105 yards away.
Key and interesting placement of the tees throughout this 9-hole golf course proved to make all golf shots interesting and somewhat challenging for the two-person teams using the best ball format.
The low score of 51 was recorded by Jean Knickerbocker and her son Thomas Knickerbocker followed by two 53's by Donald Winters and Charlie Winters and Tom Trask and Barbara Trask.
Following the tournament food and drinks were enjoyed by all in the clubhouse as heavy rains pelted the golf course.

Golf & Sidney Siegel's 95th

Offering Birthday congratulations from the Lochmor Golf Course to 95-year-old Sidney Siegel (center) are Pro-Shop Manager Frank McCoy, left, and Golf Professional Michael Decker.


Fallsburg Town Supervisor Steven Vegliante, left, presents a Certificate of Appreciation to 95-year-old golfer Sidney Siegel.


Enjoying his 95th birthday with a foursome he has been playing golf with for 32 years is Sidney Siegel, left, along with, from his right, Julie Rosenberg, Chuck Lamensdorf and Don Kriegal.


Golf & Sidney Siegel's 95th


The Lochmor Golf Course clubhouse management along with Town of Fallsburg officials gave a big birthday surprise August 4 for 95-year-old Sullivan County and Florida resident golfer Sidney Siegel.
Siegel walked into the clubhouse with his regular foursome at 9 a.m. to find a beautifully decorated birthday cake and clubhouse management and town officials greeting him with Happy Birthday salutations on the actual day he turned 95.
Following the singing of the traditional Happy Birthday song Siegel and his foursome consisting of 86-year old Julie Rosenberg, 82-year-old Chuck Lamensdorf and 85-year-old Don Kriegal enjoyed cake and coffee.
Siegel was presented with a Certificate of Appreciation from Fallsburg Town Supervisor Steven Vegliante which read, "on behalf of the Town of Fallsburg in Honor of your 95th Birthday and for your continued support of the Town of Fallsburg Golf Courses."
Special birthday wishes were given by Pro-Shop Manager Frank McCoy and Golf Professional Michael Decker.
Siegel is a 32-year resident of the Sullivan County Town and Country Resort Community and resides in the winter months in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. A former Queens and Glen Cove resident Sidney noted that he has been coming to Sullivan County for 50 some years,
Before taking up residence at Town and Country he lived in a summer residence at Sackett Lake.
Siegel, a former Practicing Certified Public Accountant (CPA) said he started playing golf at the age of 29. He was married for 56-years to his late wife, Edith. They have three sons.
Age has not effected Siegel and his foursome's love of the game of golf as they have been together chasing that little white ball for some 32 years and presently play 18-holes of golf twice a week on Monday and Thursday at Lochmor.
Besides golf Sidney likes to read, he is a World War II veteran, was the class B champion in 1989 and 1990 at Tarry Brae and practices his CPA profession by doing the books for the Town & Country Resort Community.
He showed a great sense of humor when presented the Certificate of Appreciation by saying,"I thought this might be my lifetime membership."
Additional photo coverage of this event is available at http://bght.blogspot.com/ and http://edtownsendphotos.clarkcolor.com/clark and insert the word ( photome ) for the privacy code.


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Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Here & There Column 8-9-11

A Definition Of Ethics

Ethics among members of the Sullivan County Legislature, resignations of Ethics board members and the real definition of the word "Ethics."
Let's first take Webster's Dictionary definition of the word Ethics.
Ethic--a principle of right or good conduct, or a body of such principles. Ethics--the study of of the general nature of morals and of specific moral choices.
Two fairly strong defining definitions.
The whole issue of Ethics and the conflict of interest section of the county code has become somewhat of a hot topic throughout the county as a result of Legislators Jodi Goodman and Leni Binder's controversial acceptance of tickets to Stuart Salinger's box seats at Bethel Woods with Salinger also requesting that acreage he owned in Forestburgh be included in an expanded agricultural district.
When it came time to vote on the proposal both Binder and Goodman abstained from the vote.
Both Goodman and Binder have made claims they have done nothing wrong and basically we would have to agree with them, but, placing themselves in the position they did could have very easily been avoided by simply not accepting anything from anyone.
Legislators, board members and anyone in the political structure should think before they take any freebies of any type because its only going to come back to explode in your face.
It is easy to understand why the general public gets up in arms when matters like this get aired and many times they have a right to question issues like a potential conflict of interest wherever it rears its ugly head.
We don't believe that the resignations of Phyllis Coombe and Richard Martinkovic from the county's Board of Ethics had anything to do with what took place with the two county legislators. Both Martinkovic and Coombe are highly respected in county circles.
We agree with Legislature Chairman Jonathan Rouis that the "conflict of interest" section of the county code needs special attention.
If a lesson is learned here we say lets get on with providing a government that everyone can afford.


Friday, August 5, 2011

Golfing Highlights Column 8-5-11

PGA Golf Professional Matt Kleiner


Villa Roma Ready For Democrat Tourney


Villa Roma PGA Golf Professional Matt Kleiner has the new pin placements all set up for the start today of the 30th Annual Sullivan County Democrat two-man, better ball golf tournament.
The course as always is in excellent condition and Matt noted he tends to evenly distributes pin placements making some easy and others more difficult for this premier tournament that showcases the talents of the area's finest amateur golfers.
Built in the late 1980's and opened for play in 1988, the course features some of the best fairways and greens in the region and has been called by Golf Digest "A Little Slice of Heaven."
This par 71 course has a total yardage of 6,458 from the black tees and most golfing experts agree it is a perfect challenge for the expert. The front nine total 3,183 yards and the back nice totals 3,275 yards. From the blue tees its 3,000 yards on the front nine and 3,034 on the back nine.
The fairways, greens and tee boxes in our most recent play were found to be in excellent condition..
The course was built by David Postlevaite.
Kleiner has been the PGA Golf Professional at the Villa since 1986 while the course was still under construction. He provides golf instruction by appointments which can be made at the pro shop.
The Pro shop offers a complete selection of name brand men's and women's golf apparel and equipment including Nike, Slazenger, Gear for Sport, Titleist, Foot Joy, Callaway, Ping and Taylor Made.
Seasonal golf memberships and golf fees are available by calling the pro shop.
The course also offers a driving range, putting greens and practice facilities.
The front nine of this course is very generous off the tee, but the greens must be read properly with their undulations. The front nine features two part 5's, three par 3's and four par 4's.
Hole No. 1 is a 365-yard par 4 which requires a straight drive off the tee and it's better to stay left center as the fairway slopes left to right. The key for a par here is club selection on your second shot.
Hole No. 2 is a 213-yard par 3 with the fairway sloping downhill. A trap is to the right of this green and an accurate tee shot will determine the par here.Don't stray right here.
Hole No. 3 is a 533-yard par 5. Most of the fairway runs uphill and best to keep your tee shot in the center of this fairway. The green has undulations and staying out of trouble here will get you your par.
Hole No. 4 is a 408-yard par 4 downhill with a slight dogleg to the right. A good drive here and an accurate pitch shot has you seriously looking at a birdie. The green slopes left to right .There is a deep bunker at the right front section of this green and a trap on the left side. A nice golf hole.
Hole No. 5 is a 395-yard par 4. Keep it straight here and in the middle of the fairway. The second half of the fairway slopes slightly downhill. Good shot making will produce opportunities for a par or less here.
Hole No. 6 is a 400-yard par 4, pretty much a straight shot. Traps are on the left and right front of this green.
Hole No. 7 is a 171-yard par 3, the shortest hole on the front nine, There is a trap on the left side of the green but your club selection is important in recording your par,
Hole No. 8 is a 495-yard par 5 and is the most interesting hole on the front nine, Keep your ball right center as this hole plays a slight dogleg right, The important decision on the second shot is to succeed with a long iron or good fairway wood and go for the green or lay-up with the second shot somewhere about 10 to 20 feet from the pong and marsh area, The green has traps on the right and left sides of this green. An excellent golf hole.
Hole No. 9 is a 203-yard par 3 with traps on the left side and right front of this green. An accurate teen shot get you your par.
While enjoying this beautiful layout take in the magnificent views of the countryside.
We will detail the back nine in next week's column
For information and tee times call 887-5097. Their web site is http://www.villaroma.com/


The Golf Tip

By Robert Menges


Prepare our mind for a better game.
We all have different ways of doing things on the golf course, which is why one technique or strategy might work for one person but not another.
For example, some of us will visualize the shot we want to hit in our mind, because it helps us execute the shot. For others, they have to experience the shot.
With that said ( or written, in this case), it never hurts to try something new. So here are several "pep talks" you can create to help build your confidence for the next round.
After each round of golf, take 60 seconds to sit quietly and replay your three best shots of the round. Visualize them in slow motion and lock every detail into your memory. They'll come back to cheer you on in the future..
Tell someone about your best shot of the day, but never talk about your worst shots. Professionals can usually remember every shot during a tournament, but there is one shot they "just don't recall"--it's their worst shot. Let the bad shots go, and never, ever talk about them.
After every shot, remember to say, "great shot" and mean it when you say it. the results may not be exactly what you wanted, but the ball went where you hit it. So go and do it again.
Breathe before every shot or putt, remember to breathe deeply and softly. It will relax your whole body and allow you to focus on the task at hand.
Make it a part of your pre-shot routine to consciously expect a great shot. As you pull the club from your bag, smile. As you look down the fairway or line up your putt, smile. As you stand over the ball, smile. Expect the best.
Finally, but perhaps most importantly , have fun our there. Golf is a game. Yes, it can be very challenging and frustrating at times, but it is intended to be a form of enjoyment. Enjoy the day, the weather and the time with friends, Chances are, you'll enjoy the wonderful game of golf as well.
Robert Menges is the golf pro at the Swan Lake Golf & Country Club, Mt. Hope Road, Swan Lake. He is available for private lessons and if you have a question you would like covered, he can be reached at 845-292-0323 or via e-mail at mailto:menges@localnet.com

The Putting Doctor
Putting Tip Of The Week
By Joe Bermel Jr.


If you want to score well you must learn to putt well.
Without a doubt the #1 key is "organization of your mind."
To ask and answer the questions, "what are we going to do and how are we going to do it.
Remember the challenge in putting, in golf, and in sports in general is coordinating the mind and the body.
Joe Bermel is available for private lessons, group, corporate, organization and golf shows-tournaments. His special edition DVD "How To Putt Well" is available by calling 631-589-1384, at his web site http://www.theputtingdoctor.com/ or by email at joe@theputtingdoctor.com


This column is written by Ed Townsend, a professional PR consultant to the amateur and professional sport of golf and to several golf writers associations. If you have a topic that would make good reading or have league scores and tournament information, Ed can be reached at 845-439-8177 or by email at edwardctownsend@hotmail.com For a more expanded version of this column please visit our Web Page at http://bghtblogspot.com/ We are also on Facebook.

Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Here & There Column 8-2-11

Multi-Layered Govt. Is Antiquated

Is government in Sullivan County understanding the realities that multi-layered government is antiquated?
The Hudson Valley Pattern For Progress in April issued a "White Paper" from their Government Efficiency Task Force titles "Government Efficiency In the Hudson Valley-Creating A Positive Approach to Change."
If politicians running our local governments have not read this report then their heads must be buried in sand.
The five-page detailed report truly would help local governments ease the many burdens they face today with having to downsize, consolidate and do away with much of the duplication of services they presently have.
The report points out that it's a clear fact that much of "New York State's multi-layered form of government is viewed as antiquated, arcane and redundant."
The report clearly states that "our conglomeration of villages, towns, counties and the State plus overlapping independent school and special districts drives higher costs and highly visible service inefficiencies."
In addition this five page detailed sheet notes that these "inefficiencies lead residents to question the utility of this outdated system," and "the cost of maintaining so many units of government with multiple levels and overlaps is no longer sustainable."
Lets just briefly look at these multiple levels and overlaps here in Sullivan County......in the Town of Thompson we have the Town government and the Village of Monticello government, in the Town of Fallsburg we have the Fallsburg government and the Village of Woodridge government, in the Town of Liberty we have both the town and village governments, in the Town of Mamakating we have the town and Village of Bloomingburg governments and the Village of Jeffersonville shares government with the Town of Callicoon.
Does the taxpayer in Sullivan County with a population of 75,828 get the benefit of 1 county government, 15 township governments, five village governments, 8 school districts, 13 fire protection districts, 45 lighting districts, 26 sewer district and 20 water districts?
It's up to the folks that pay the bills in this county to tell these many forms of government to cooperate, have shared services, consolidate, dissolve and to do away with so much duplication.